Tue 6/6/2017 -
1:00pm to 2:30pm
Cluster: Prevention

Sexual health promotion is sexual violence prevention. As more policies at a State level support these programs, the more young people throughout Oregon will get the information they deserve. However, the provision of sexuality education typically doesn’t include all of the information young people want and need, nor does it typically include an intersectional approach. The co-presenters together have over 35 years of experience providing sexuality education and training to youth and adults, and are here to share some new information and activities, lessons learned, and build participants skills as sexuality educators.

Presented by:

Shelagh Johnson
Oregon Health Authority
Shelagh Johnson is currently the Youth Sexual Health Coordinator for the Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Division within the Adolescent and School Health Program. With over 15 years of experience working in sexuality education in both non-profit and government settings, Shelagh’s current focus is continuing the work of the Oregon Youth Sexual Health Plan by further expanding our concepts of youth sexual health beyond pregnancy prevention. After eight years and numerous schools, Shelagh completed a B.S. at Portland State University in Zoology with a Certificate in Women’s Studies, and also proudly has an A.A. degree from Anne Arundel Community College in Maryland. Shelagh was awarded the Willamette Week’s Skidmore Prize in 2006, the Joan Helmich Health Educator of the Year Award in 2009, and was a fellow in the Ladder to Leadership Program through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2010-2011 focused on race, power, and privilege.

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Malika Edden
Oregon Health Authority
Malika Edden works as the Health Education Coordinator for the Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Division within the Reproductive Health Program. She was born in Washington and moved to Portland to acquire her Masters in Social Work at Portland State University. Her love of talking and teaching about sexuality began when she was 17. She had the opportunity to join a peer education program that was focused on educating other youth about safer sex practices. She realized then how important it is for people to be able to speak openly and honestly about sexuality and how many of us don’t get that opportunity. She has taught youth and adults, and would tell you 5th graders are by far her favorite age group to teach. In her role at the state she works towards creating and identifying resources, trainings and other supportive tools for reproductive health providers across the state. She tries to think about and incorporate equity, social work and trauma responsiveness to this work and call out how systems impact our ability to lead healthy sexual lives.