These webinars hosted by the Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence cover aspects of our Prevention Through Liberation project, which centers culturally-specific primary prevention efforts in communities throughout Oregon.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 2:30pm to 4:00pm

This Prevention Through Liberation webinar will provide an opportunity for attendees to explore the intersection of systemic oppression and sexual and domestic violence in our communities. Coalition staff will share principles of anti-oppression as primary prevention. We will focus on creating prevention projects, strategies, and practices centered in Oregon’s historically marginalized communities and focused on community resilience.

Presented by:

Vanessa Timmons, OCADSV Executive Director
Vanessa Timmons has been a writer, activist, and women’s health advocate for over 25 years. She attended Marylhurst University’s Multidisciplinary Studies Program in Portland, Oregon, and has continued her formal education through certificates and training, including the Interpersonal Neurobiology of Trauma Certification Program at Portland State University. Vanessa has served as the Director of Programs at Raphael House of Portland, a Northwest regional field organizer for the National Organization for Women, and the domestic violence program coordinator for the Multnomah County Domestic Violence Coordination Office, in addition to serving OCADSV in the past as the Women of Color Coordinator and Board Chair.

Choya Adkison-Stevens, OCADSV Equity and Inclusion Coordinator
Choya brings 20 years experience working with people from marginalized communities. Her experiences witnessing systemic inequities inspire her commitment to anti-oppression work; her passion manifests in education, organizing and advocacy toward bold goals of social change. She has a BA in American Studies and Family Studies from Marlboro College, and has facilitated social change education for nonprofit organizations, state employees and the broader community. Choya has served on the Boards of Directors for Sisters Of The Road and Speaking Out Against Sibling Sexual Abuse, and is a founding member of Showing Up for Racial Justice Portland (SURJ PDX). When she's not working or activisting, look for Choya in her garden.

Thursday, July 19, 2018 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm

Historical trauma is defined by Maria Yellow Horse Brave Heart PhD as “cumulative emotional and psychological wounding across generations, including the lifespan, which emanates from massive group trauma.” Join us for a conversation exploring the intersection of historical trauma, violence, and healing as it affects domestic and sexual violence prevention.
 

Presented by:

Tawna Sanchez, Director of Family Services at NAYA Family Center
Tawna was honored in 2006 as a Buffett Award finalist for her steadfast commitment to help Native women and children lead lives free of violence and abuse. She has also worked on peace and social justice issues on an international level. Sanchez is currently the Director of Family Services at the Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA Family Center) coordinating services in domestic violence, rape prevention education, foster care services for youth and their families, and services to Native American elders. Sanchez also serves in the Oregon State Legislature as the Representative for HD 43 in North and Northeast Portland. Ms. Sanchez has also earned a Master’s of Social Work from Portland State University. 

Vanessa Timmons, OCADSV Executive Director
Vanessa Timmons has been a writer, activist, and women’s health advocate for over 25 years. She attended Marylhurst University’s Multidisciplinary Studies Program in Portland, Oregon, and has continued her formal education through certificates and training, including the Interpersonal Neurobiology of Trauma Certification Program at Portland State University. Vanessa has served as the Director of Programs at Raphael House of Portland, a Northwest regional field organizer for the National Organization for Women, and the domestic violence program coordinator for the Multnomah County Domestic Violence Coordination Office, in addition to serving OCADSV in the past as the Women of Color Coordinator and Board Chair.

Thursday, September 6, 2018 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm

PAS (Prevención de Agresión Sexual), is a bicultural and bilingual prevention program that has progressed over the last 8 years through women of color educators and advocates within Proyecto UNICA’s, domestic and sexual violence agency. This webinar will utilize story-telling as a methodology to describe how the PAS program developed culturally specific prevention and anti-oppression curriculum for Latinx youth, ages 12 to 24. In addition to curriculum development, the PAS program has connected youth with art and media practices, institutions and community events outside of the classroom to nurture healing, self-care, and intergenerational resilience and resistance. Participants of the webinar will grow a critical lens of trauma-informed and culturally specific prevention programs that move beyond a single-issue approach to preventing gender-based violence within youth prevention and education programming.

Monday, October 22, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:30pm

In this webinar, we will explore the value of incorporating evaluation into prevention work, identify methods for conducting evaluation that best suit the needs of our various programs and capacities, and learn about different tools and techniques that can be used when doing evaluation.

Presenters

Jennifer Grove (she, her, hers) is the Prevention Director for the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), and has worked in the sexual violence prevention movement for over 20 years. She spent the first seven of those years working in community-based domestic violence and sexual assault programs. In her current role, Jennifer coordinates the national prevention work of the NSVRC, providing training and resources to sexual assault coalitions, state departments of health, local community programs, and other organizations working to develop, implement, and evaluate sexual violence prevention strategies. She has conducted numerous trainings around the country on topics related to the prevention of sexual violence. In her spare time, Jennifer enjoys baking, photographing nature, traveling, and hiking in the great outdoors. She also enjoys being a pet parent to her 2 cats, Milo and Theodore.

Mo Lewis is the Prevention Specialist at the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), the co-founder of the Violence Prevention Coalition in King County, WA and is a co-author of the FLASH curriculum, a comprehensive sexual health education curriculum for high school and middle school students. Mo holds a degree from the University of Washington and has worked in the field of sexual assault prevention for over 10 years. Before shifting to sexual violence prevention, Mo worked in the field of HIV prevention with a particular focus on youth empowerment within the LGBTQ community.

Monday, October 29, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:30pm

Evaluation is about accountability and continuous learning and improvement.  Too often, accountability is framed only as being accountable to an agency’s funders and boards.  In this session, we will discuss about how we are most accountable to communities most directly impacted by oppression and how to center them in our evaluative and learning practices.  We'll commiserate around the challenges, talk about effective evaluation practices and principles, including considerations of trauma and cultural relevance. 

Presenters

Josephine V. Serrata, Ph.D. is a clinical & community psychologist. She is currently co-owner and licensed psychologist at prickly pear therapy and training where she shares her expertise in trauma-informed and culturally relevant approaches to healing and organization development. Dr. Serrata also serves as a research evaluation consultant and former director of research and evaluation at the National [email protected] Network for Healthy Families & Communities, a national domestic violence organization. Her research and evaluation work are embedded in participatory research and action-oriented evaluation.   

Maya Pilgrim is the Evaluation Manager at the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault, supporting learning and evaluation efforts at TAASA and local rape crisis centers. She has been a part of collective efforts towards more equitable and just communities within the US and internationally for over twenty years related to youth development, health and forced migration. She has a BA in Psychology and a Master’s in International Development and Social Change.